Measuring education results June 17

Date:      13 June 17
By:          Frank Gue, B.Sc., MBA, P.Eng.,
               2252 Joyce St., Burlington, ON L7R 2B5, Canada
                905 634 9538
For:         Mr. Wm Mathis and Ms Gail Sunderman, NEPC
Re:          Measuring education results
Good day, William and Gail

Here are a citizen’s thoughts about the following sentence from your post (below), which reads:

It also relies on test score outcomes as the sole measure of success, thus ignoring other impacts these strategies may have on students and their local communities or the local school systems where they occur.
This warning appears repeatedly and predictably in statements by education apologists, some of whom, they should candidly acknowledge,
fervently wish not to be measured at all.  As stated emphatically and publicly by one local (Burlington, ON) Supt of Ed, We will not use comparisons.  
OK then, lady, you will not improve your system, since improvement depends on comparison, which depends on measurement.
The educational enterprise as a whole should take to heart the motto of the Fraser Institute of Vancouver, BC, Canada:
If it matters, measure it.  We should start by agreeing, as I trust we can, that Education matters a whole lot.
I am a Professional Electronics Engineer (no, not an electrician, as many mistakenly think).  One definition:  An Engineer is one who believes in
measurement, knows how to measure, measures, and abides by the result of the measurement whether they agree with his opinion or not.
My own aphorism, then, which springs from that definition and addresses the NEP’s dismissive reference to test scores, is:  The admitted inability to measure everything is not a valid excuse for measuring nothing.  And so, my good fellow educators, dismiss test scores if you feel you must, but you must then propose alternative specific, auditable measurements.
 
What are they?
Cheers,
Frank Gue,
Professional Engineer
On Jun 13, 2017, at 10:05 AM, National Education Policy Center <NEPC.NEWS@gmail.com> wrote:
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